Dieter’s Brews Make Tea Time a Dangerous Affair
April 13, 2020 by

A cup of hot herbal tea may feel soothing to the soul, but instead of soothing the body, some herbal teas can make you sick. This is especially true with so-called dieter’s teas—herbal teas containing senna, aloe, buckthorn, and other plant-derived laxatives that, when consumed in excessive amounts, can cause diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, stomach cramps, …

Ozone Generators: Criminal Prosecution
November 1, 1999 by

Kenneth R. Thiefault and his wife, Mardel Barber, formerly of Jupiter, Florida, were sentenced in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida in March to prison terms that together total more than eight years and fines that add up to more than $100,000. They illegally distributed ozone generators, devices that turn oxygen …

Promo Shot Backfires in Publicity Seeker
May 1, 1998 by

A businessman got more publicity than he bargained for when he appeared on the cover of a Dallas magazine to promote his product for attention deficit disorder (ADD). The close-up of the product caught the attention of federal and state health officials and eventually led to a nationwide recall. Gary Lewellyn, former chief executive officer …

Promo Shot Backfires on Publicity Seeker
May 1, 1998 by

A businessman got more publicity than he bargained for when he appeared on the cover of a Dallas magazine to promote his product for attention deficit disorder (ADD). The close-up of the product caught the attention of federal and state health officials and eventually led to a nationwide recall. Gary Lewellyn, former chief executive officer …

Promoter of 714X Cure-All Faces Prison for Selling Unapproved Drug
November 1, 1996 by

A New York book publicist has been sentenced to prison for selling an unapproved new drug espoused in a book he was promoting. The book deals with a French-born biologist living in Canada who developed a camphor-derived drug he calls 714X, which he claims can cure cancer, AIDS, and other diseases. The drug has never …

Immunostim
September 1, 1996 by

A California doctor and his partner viewed their homemade cancer treatment as alternative medicine. But a judge declared it “snake oil.” FDA laboratory analysis indicated the treatment, called “Immunostim,” contained substances found in common cleaning fluids, such as dish detergent and toilet bowl cleaner. Patients paid as much as $7,500 per treatment to have the …