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Some Notes on Lelord Kordel

Lelord Kordel (1908-2001), who wrote about twenty books, recommended high-protein foods, lecithin (“the miracle nutrient”), and high-dosage vitamin and mineral supplements for everyone. According to court records, he began producing and marketing supplements in 1941, operating under various trade names. In 1946, he was convicted of misbranding and fined $4,000. One product in the case …

Lelord Kordel (1908-2001), who wrote about twenty books, recommended high-protein foods, lecithin (“the miracle nutrient”), and high-dosage vitamin and mineral supplements for everyone. According to court records, he began producing and marketing supplements in 1941, operating under various trade names. In 1946, he was convicted of misbranding and fined $4,000. One product in the case was Gotu Kola, an herbal tablet said to restore youth and “produce erect posture, sharp eyes, velvety skin, limbs of splendid proportions, deep chests, firm bodies, gracefully curved hips, flat abdomens” and even “pleasing laughter.” Thirteen other products were falsely claimed to be effective against various conditions including heart disease, liver troubles, tuberculosis, bone infections and impotence.

Kordel had a brush with the FTC in 1957 and two more with the FDA in 1961. In 1963, when he was president of Detroit Vital Foods, Inc., products shipped by the company were found to be misbranded because they were accompanied by Kordel publications which falsely claimed that nutritional products could treat practically all diseases. After the appeals process was ended in 1971, Kordel was fined $10,000 and served one year in prison. Catalogs from Vital Foods, Inc., described him as “America’s leading vitamin and diet expert” and claimed that he has never been ill.

Summaries of Seizure Cases
  • 2580. Misbranding of Gotu Kola tablets, Minerals Plus tablets, sarsaparilla root, Cetabs tablets, Fenugreek tea, Fero-B-Plex tablets, Bolax tablets, Ormotabs tablets, Ribotabs tablets, Eordel tablets, Everm wheat germ oil capsules, Kordel-A capsules, Garlic Plus tablets, Niamin tablets, and sarsaparilla tea. Three Informations: U. S. v. Laura Eordel Gotu Kola Distributors) and Lelord Eordel, U. S. v. Lelord Eordel Lelord Eordel Products), and U. S. v. Lelord Eordel (Lelord Eordel Products and Nutrition Enterprises). Pleas of not guilty. Tried to the court. Verdict of guilty against Lelord Kordel; verdict of not guilty against Laura Kordel. Fine of $4,000 against Lelord Kordel. Judgment affirmed upon appeal to U. S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and upon appeal to U. S. Supreme Court.
  • 2581. Misbranding of Gotu Kola tablets, fenugreek tea, Bolax tablets, Garlic Plus tablets, Ribotabs tablets, Minerals Plus tablets, sarsaparilla tea, Everm wheat germ oil capsules, Kordel tablets, Ormotabs tablets, Cetabs tablets, Fero-B-Plex tablets, Kordel-A capsules, Niamin tablets, Papaya Plus tablets, and Matto tablets. U. S. v. 134 Packages, etc. (and 3 other seizure actions).
  • 3649. Alleged misbranding of fenugreek tea, Cetabs tablets, Ribotabs tablets, Niamin tablets, Ormotabs tablets, Kordel-A capsules, and Minerals Plus Chlorophyll and Vitamin D tablets. U. S. v. 269 Packages, etc. (and 1 other seizure action).
  • 3664. Alleged misbranding of Kordel-E capsules, Aminex tablets, Fero-B-Plex tablets, and Garlic Plus tablets. U. S. v. 1 Case, etc.
  • 14294: Misbranding of Gotu Kola tablets, Pantomin tablets, Panto-Plus, Ribotabs tablets, Minerals Plus tablets, Everm wheat germ oil capsules, Cetabs tablets, Fero-B-Plex tablets, Kordel tablets, and Niamin tablets. U. S. v. 134 Packages, etc. (and 3 other seizure actions).








Vermont Stops “Panderyl” Weight Loss Scam

In 1994, the Vermont Attorney General accused Lowensen International, Inc., and its president, Louis-Martin Pilote, of marketing an alleged weight-loss program with false claims. The complaint stated: Lowensen, headquartered in Quebec, Canada, was doing business as the National Medical Research Institute NMRI), which received product orders and payments through a mail-drop arrangement in Swanton, Vermont. …

In 1994, the Vermont Attorney General accused Lowensen International, Inc., and its president, Louis-Martin Pilote, of marketing an alleged weight-loss program with false claims. The complaint stated:

  • Lowensen, headquartered in Quebec, Canada, was doing business as the National Medical Research Institute NMRI), which received product orders and payments through a mail-drop arrangement in Swanton, Vermont.
  • NMRI marketed a diet supplement called “Panderyl,” a cream referred to as “P5B12 Cream,” and a book called Doctor, How Come I can’t Lose Weight, said to have been written by Alan Lacey, M.D.
  • Promotional literature described Lacey as NMRI’s nutrition consultant and included a letter from him plus a documents that included his photograph and listed his credentials. However, Dr. Lacey did not exist.
  • The promotional material falsely claimed that users of the program were likely to experience permanent weight loss of 4 pounds a week without limiting food intake.
  • Prospective buyers were told they they could try the program free of charge by sending a postdated check that would be held for 21 days and returned uncashed if they were not satisfied with their results. However, the checks were routinely cashed.

In 1995, the case was settled with a consent agreement under which Pilote and his company denied wrongdoing but agreed to:

  • Permanently refrain from doing business in Vermont.
  • Pay a $50,000 penalty under Vermont’s Consumer Fraud Act.
  • Issue refunds to consumers who complained.
  • Send a refund to all Vermont customers regardless of whether they complained.
  • Cooperate with a deposition in which the details of their business operation would be explored.

Lowensen International, Inc., which was incorporated in 1993, was dissolved in 2000.